Annual Perseid Meteor Shower in Rocky Mountain National Park

Author:
Updated:
Original:
Perseid Trails in Rocky Mountain National Park

Each August, the Perseid meteor shower reappears in Colorado—and Rocky Mountain National Park’s dark skies make for a brilliant show. These shooting stars (astronomical debris heating up as they rub up against Earth’s atmosphere) appear at a rate of one per minute or more at the peak.

Direction of the Perseids

Direction of the Perseids

When to see the Perseids?

According to NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke, (www.space.com/32868-perseid-meteor-shower-guide.html) the meteor shower's peak will be visible both the nights of Aug. 11-12 and Aug. 12-13, 2018.

Don't expect to see too much early in the night. The best viewing time is between midnight and just before dawn. Get as far away from unnatural lights as possible, and give your eyes at least 20 minutes to adjust. Meteor watching is a waiting game so bring a blanket and get comfortable.

For three nights, August 1-12, the park will hold a Night Sky Festival with ranger-led activities. For more information, visit www.nps.gov/romo/planyourvisit/night_sky_festival.htm.

Where to see them?

You want to be in a wide open area with 360-degree views. In Rocky Mountain National Park, head for Trail Ridge Road, Kawuneeche Valley, Beaver Meadows, or Lake Irene.

Below is a timelapse video of 2012's shower filmed by Dave Dugdale at Lake Irene in the park. Nightime shots start at 1:30 marker on video.

Related

Perseid Meteor Shower on Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park

Night Sky Programs in Rocky Mountain National Park

Ranger-led night sky programs are held in the park in the summer starting in mid-June.

Wildflowers at Glass Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park

Where Locals Hike in Rocky Mountain National Park

Hike three uncrowded trails in Rocky Mountain National Park: Sky Pond, Moraine Park to Bear Lake, and the Tonahutu Creek/North Inlet Loop

Watching elk in Moraine Valley in Rocky Mountain National Park

Essentials of Autumn Elk Watching in Rocky Mountain National Park

Where to see elk, when to see them, where to park, and elk watching etiquette at Rocky Mountain National Park.

Grosbeak bird

Birdwatching in Rocky Mountain National Park

Since Rocky Mountain National Park's creation in 1915, 280 species of birds have been spotted throughout the park and surrounding regions.

Fishing at Lily Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park

Fishing in Rocky Mountain National Park

With four main species of fish, more than 40 fishable lakes, and 25 alpine streams, casting a line is almost sacrilegious.

Climbing Longs Peak in Rocky Mountain National Park

Rock Climbing in Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park's wide variety of peaks, including Longs Peak, makes it a mecca for climbers around the world.

Aspen trees in autumn

See Aspens in Fall at Rocky Mountain National Park

Starting in late August, aspens in the highest reaches of the Park begin their annual quaking, a term to describe the aspens unique leaves changing a golden-yellow hue and how they react in wind.

Alberta Falls in Rocky Mountain National Park

14 Favorite Waterfalls in Rocky Mountain National Park

All but one of Rocky Mountain Park's waterfalls require at least a short hike meaning that it's entirely possible to enjoy a waterfall by yourself.

Sunset at Lily Lake in Rocky Mountain National Park

Lakes Inside Rocky Mountain National Park

The park is chocked-full of lakes due to the large glaciers that carved out deep canyons and cirques, while leaving teardrops behind.